Ubuntu and Python

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Ubuntu and Python

Postby Tornado » Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:39 pm

Hi

After reading a few other conversations and taking their advice I purchased "Learning Python". I talks about Python3 being the way forward for python, but it will take awhile until most have moved on to it. Does anyone know if Ubuntu will imclude it soon as my install (Precise Pangolin) still runs 2.7.x .

The book focuses on 3 but teaches 2 along the way. I probably will only program for my own benefit first up. Should I install 3 and go for it or keep a foot in both camps?
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Yoriz » Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:50 pm

Hi, I have no idea but welcome to the forum.
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Tornado » Fri Mar 01, 2013 10:56 pm

Yoriz wrote:Hi, I have no idea but welcome to the forum.

Thanks Yoriz. Looking at peoples.join dates it looks like I'm onboard in the early days.
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Yoriz » Fri Mar 01, 2013 11:08 pm

Sorry my post wasn't very good, I'm on windows and use version 2.7, when i said i have no idea it was about the Ubuntu part.
take a look at this link http://wiki.python.org/moin/Python2orPython3
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Tornado » Fri Mar 01, 2013 11:53 pm

That's ok. I'm sure most people are still on 2.7. Probably until backwards compatibility improves. Just a guess though
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby metulburr » Sat Mar 02, 2013 3:10 am

There are only 2 linux distros that i know of that use python3.x as default, which is Arch and Gentoo. Ubuntu still uses default python2.x, as do many others.

Does anyone know if Ubuntu will imclude it soon as my install (Precise Pangolin) still runs 2.7.x .

Your ubuntu should have 2.7 but you can download/install python3.x and have both avaiable:
Code: Select all
sudo apt-get install python3.2

which is the latest i see in the ubuntu repo, checking real quickly
then at that point
Code: Select all
python
refers to 2.x and
Code: Select all
python3
refers to 3.x

Code: Select all
metulburr@ubuntu:~$ python -V
Python 2.7.3
metulburr@ubuntu:~$ python3 -V
Python 3.2.3
metulburr@ubuntu:~$
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Tornado » Sat Mar 02, 2013 6:11 am

Thanks Metulburr
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby metulburr » Sat Mar 02, 2013 8:04 am

I purchased "Learning Python"

If you are refering to Learning Python 4th edition by mark lutz? That is my first encounter with python. I love that book and use it as a reference all the time.
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Re: Ubuntu and Python

Postby Tornado » Sat Mar 02, 2013 10:14 am

metulburr wrote:
I purchased "Learning Python"

If you are refering to Learning Python 4th edition by mark lutz? That is my first encounter with python. I love that book and use it as a reference all the time.


That book exactly. I think it was your list of information sources in another thread that led me to it. I have looked at plenty of other references, but no others seem to start from the ground up. Even with some experience in other languages I get lost due to the tutor assuming prior knowledge of important aspects of the language. When I want to know how something works I really want to delve into how it works and why. Anyone can cut and paste parts of someone elses code because it "Just works". I know it's advantageous to use pre written code to save re-inventing the wheel and is one huge advantage of Python, but it doesn't hurt to get why it does what it does. Helps kill off bugs as they appear too.

Hopefully once I have learned more I can contribute more on the forum rather than soaking up others knowledge.
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